How equal is Roadburn? 10 questions to Becky Laverty

Organisers Becky Laverty and Walter Hoeijmakers.

Why are you organising Roadburn every year?

– Roadburn has a twenty year tradition of presenting the most forward thinking, innovative and exciting bands out there; there is always something new coming up and new ways of appreciating what has gone before – which means that every year we have a new way of celebrating the music that’s out there.

What drives you as an organiser?

– Providing a platform for new bands or as-yet undiscovered bands and presenting them to open-minded audiences who are eager to experience something new. I have only been involved with Roadburn for five years, but Walter has dedicated two decades to always pushing the boundaries of what a heavy music festival can be.

What feeling do you want the visitors to bring home with them when the festival is over?

– One of joy and one of having discovered and experienced something special – and perhaps even transformative. A lot of people tell us that being at Roadburn feels like coming come, so we hope that when they leave they are already anticipating their return the following year.

In what way is Roadburn different from other festivals?

– We have so many additional things that make the line up and the festival as a whole something special. We have a curator each year that puts together a part of the line up, leaving their own personal mark on each edition. We have an artist in residence, which is a band or artist that performs multiple times across the weekend with sets that showcase different facets of their creativity. We have a different poster artist each year who is also honoured with an art exhibition of their work. We have other art exhibitions too – visual art is so closely linked to music that both deserve to be celebrated alongside each other. We also have a side programme of talks, Q&As, panel discussions etc. But the over-arching umbrella that all of these elements come under is that we strive to create an atmosphere where creativity is celebrated and everybody feels equal; everybody that performs, attends, and contributes to Roadburn also contributes to the community feel, and I think that’s a significant part of what makes Roadburn a bit different to other festivals.

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How do you appreciate the distribution between men and women in the audience at this years festival?

– We have a good split of men and women at Roadburn. I think there are probably slightly more men than women, but the divide is not as obvious as it once was, or as it sometimes still is at other festivals and shows. Roadburn is inclusive to all genders – on and off stage.

Your most recent listen song and album?

– I’ve been listening to the new Cave In album which I bought at Roadburn! The first track from that – All Illusion – is on Spotify now. And I also put it on last week’s Roadburn: Essential Sound playlist – which is a playlist that we put together every Friday with the tracks that we’re listening to at the moment. Please do subscribe! https://open.spotify.com/user/roadburn-festival/playlist/56jVMfxcgimVpN0MUSpBhp?si=cSQDsHfXRZyzydjGUwpBJA

What is the most common word you use?

– Amazing!

In your opinion – how equal is the rock and metal scene today?

– Not equal enough. Great strides have been made to make it more so, but when there are still people discriminated against because of the colour of their skin, or because of their gender, or who they love, we are not equal. That goes for the wider world too, and of course it trickles down to smaller communities like the rock and metal scenes.

What do you do to improve the situation?

– Inequality is so pervasive and takes on so many forms it’s hard to know where to start – to answer your question or to improve the situation. I don’t have the answers on a global or international scale. I do know that we can each learn to be a little bit more accommodating and generous with the way we interact with people, especially when it comes to listening to people who have had experiences different to our own.

What do you think it takes to achieve a more equal scene for both musicians and the whole community?

– An increase in tolerance and a celebration of our differences.

 

#3 Liv Sin: “Dedicated to prove them wrong”

Liv Sin feminist metal community dear darkness

New episode of the Dear Darkness podcast is out featuring Liv Sin! Hear all about her new band, the difficult split up with Sister Sin and learn how to deal with haters.

This one is also a festival special. Why are there so much men on stage at metal festivals? We have some tips for all the conservative organisers out there.

Calling out for names for an inspirational list of heavy metal and rock bands with at least one member that identifies as a women! The band needs to have at least 2000 followers or fans at their official Instagram or Facebook page. Post us your favourites in comments or at hello@deardarknessofficial.com!

Listen here on iTunes

#RockHardFestival lineup: 2% women

Past weekend also presented @rockhardfestival in Germany. Nice lineup for sure, but containing 86 males and only 2 females gives them a lineup equality rate of only 2% women. They could for sure do better next year, don’t you think? ✌️

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#muskelrock lineup: 14% women

Festival season 2017 continues!

This past weekend hosted one of Sweden’s mightiest: #muskelrock. Very talented women musicians headlining, and a gender spread of 111 men and 18 women which equals 14% women in their lineup. Going in the right direction, right?? What festivals are you guys looking forward to this summer?

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#copenhell lineup: 2% women

Festival season is here. Let’s elaborate on the lineups for this year, shall we?
First off, let’s take a look at @copenhell in Denmark. They come on strong with 183 men vs 3 women in their 2017 lineup. That’s equals a total of 2% females. Great job, guys!?What do festival lineups look like where you live?

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Guess what? There are women.

For years we have listened to the same words over and over again when we are asking questions about why women are absent from the stage, from the covers, in featured articles, in music history. Dear Darkness is a reaction to that.

Men interviewing men, men recommending men in all male bands, men putting other men on stage. Many years ago we thought this was going to get different, but still in 2017 we find not a damn thing has changed.

It’s very obvious that the voice of rock and metal still is the voice of a man. There are many women that plays, writes and talks about metal, but it’s always on conditions set by men. Female musicians still gets questions about their appearance, choice of clothes or family relationships and are on a daily basis being exposed to sexism in the music industry and the public.

Year after year heavy metal festivals all around the world fails to put women on the lineup, the trolling and sexism online are running wild with editors that could care less and fans are even getting harassed at shows.

Dear Darkness is a feministic community where musicians, fans and people connected to the heavy stage can share their story, for people to exchange experiences and a way of raising voices and bring light on what some people would like to call “a different” perspective – ours.

We are aiming to kill the myth “there are no women”. Cause we are here. And we are fucking loud.

/Sofia and Frida of Dear Darkness